PBC EU Update - 27th May 2016

Brexit would cause 'DIY recession' says Osborne, but Iain Duncan Smith calls him 'Pinocchio'

Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, and Prime Minister David Cameron, presented Treasury analysis into the short-term economic impact of Brexit which shows there would more than likely be a yearlong “DIY recession”.

Read more about this story here in The Independent, here in The Daily Mail, here in The Guardian, here in The Telegraph, here in The BBC, and here in The Sun.

NHS chief says Brexit would be dangerous for health service

The chief executive of NHS England, Simon Stevens, has warned that Britain leaving the EU could send the economy into a “tailspin” that would have a damaging knock-on effect for the health service. In the interview with BBC 1’s The Andrew Marr Show, Stevens countered claims by leave campaigners that Brexit would free up funds for the NHS and reduce pressure on GP surgeries and hospitals by limiting further immigration.

Read more about this story here in The Sun, here on The Guardian, here in The BBC, and here in The Telegraph.

Iain Duncan Smith claims that Business Secretary Sajid Javid privately backs Brexit

Iain Duncan Smith, has said that Business Secretary Sajid Javid had admitted that he wants the UK to leave the European Union, before publicly backing the Remain campaign on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. In the Radio 4 programme, Mr.Javid defended the latest Treasury analysis warning of a year-long recession if the UK electorate vote to leave the EU.

Read more about this story here in The Sun, here in The Independent, and here in The Guardian.

Vote Leave embroiled in race row over Turkey security threat claims

On the eve of an England v. Turkey football match in Manchester, the official campaign to leave the EU fronted by Michael Gove has been accused of “stoking the fires of prejudice” after it claimed that continued membership would put Britons in danger as a result of a high level of criminality and gun ownership among Turkish citizens.

Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here in The Sun, here in The Independent, and here in The Daily Mail.

IFS warns Brexit would extend austerity for two more years

Britain’s leading tax and spending think tank, the Institute for Fiscal Studies, has warned that leaving the European Union would force ministers to extend austerity measures by up to two years to achieve a budget surplus. The independent IFS said the impact of lower GDP growth and extra borrowing costs would knock a 20 billion to 40 billion hole in the government’s finances by 2020 and leave ministers struggling to balance the books before 2022, two years later than forecast.

Read more about this story here on The BBC, here in The Independent, here in The Sun, here on The Guardian, and here in The Telegraph.

G7 world leaders say Brexit poses a serious risk to global growth

In a G7 meeting in Japan, seven world leaders have warned of the risk to global economy if Britain votes to leave the European Union in a referendum next month. The UK leaving the European Union would “reverse the trend towards greater global trade and investment, and the jobs they create, and is a further serious risk to growth” they said in a joint declaration. The warning was listed together with concerns about terrorism, the refugee crisis and geopolitical conflicts as a potential threat of “non-economic origin”.

Read more about this story here in The Daily Mail, here in The BBC, here in The Guardian and here in The Independent.

Alex Salmond says Scotland would leave UK in event of Brexit

Alex Salmond, the former First Minister and now the Scottish National party’s foreign affairs spokesman in Westminster, argued in the first televised debate of the referendum campaign, that the Scottish government would hold a fresh independence referendum – and win it – within two years, if Scotland was at risk of being “dragged” out of the European Union after June’s referendum

Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here in The Independent, and here on The BBC.